The Daily Rundown: July 1 Means Minimum Wage Hikes

July 1, 2019
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Category: The Daily Rundown

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Welcome to the Small Business Run Down. Each day, we bring you stories and trends that impact small business owners and their workforce.

Today, minimum wage increases go live in many places, why bother with digital marketing, and a word on paternity leave.

Minimum Wage Rises in Multiple States and Cities

Minimum wage is a hot topic at work, at home and in politics. With a new fiscal year for many municipalities, planned increases to the minimum wage went into effect in multiple states and cities today.

In Minneapolis, Minn. the minimum wage rose from $10.25 to $11 per hour for businesses with 100 or fewer employees. The wage increased from $11.25 to $12.25 per hour for businesses with more than 100 employees. The increase is part of a schedule of hikes until hitting $15 per hour in 2024.

The minimum wage in Oregon also rose today. Across the state the wage rose by $0.50. In the Portland metro area that means the wage is $12.50 per hour. Outside Metro Portland, it rose to $11.25 per hour and in rural areas it reaches $11 per hour.

In Denver, Colo. the minimum wage rose to $13 per hour. It’s also part of a planned schedule of increases rising by $1 per hour every year until hitting $15 per hour in 2021. After that, it will rise based on the regional Consumer Price Index.

New Jersey’s minimum wage jumped from $8.85 to $10 per hour. The state’s minimum wage will also increase again in January and then every year until it hits $15 per hour in 2024.

Chicago’s minimum wage rose to $13 per hour.

Washington DC also saw the minimum wage increase from $13.25 to $14 per hour. It will hit $15 per hour next year, then rise annually based on the Consumer Price Index.

Montgomery County in Maryland increased the minimum wage to $13.25 per hour for businesses with fewer than 26 employees, and to $14.25 per hour for businesses with 26 or more employees.

And 11 municipalities increased the minimum wage in California. The following table should help.

Alameda $13.50 per hour
Berkeley $15.59 per hour
Emeryville $16.30 per hour
Fremont $13.50 for businesses with 26 or more employees

$11.00 for businesses with fewer than 26 employees

Los Angeles $14.25 for businesses with 26 or more employees

$13.25 for businesses with fewer than 26 employees

Malibu $14.25 for businesses with 26 or more employees

$13.25 for businesses with fewer than 26 employees

Milpitas $15.00 per hour
Pasadena $14.25 for businesses with 26 or more employees

$13.25 for businesses with fewer than 26 employees

San Francisco $15.59 per hour
San Leandro $14.00 per hour
Santa Monica $14.25 for businesses with 26 or more employees

$13.25 for businesses with fewer than 26 employees

The Number: $15. Many of the minimum wage increases are tied to a larger national effort to have the per-hour-wage reach $15.

The Quote: I’m expecting things to increase, probably not exponentially, but I do expect things to pick up — the frequency and number of complaints to rise.”

Why Do Marketing?

Why do small businesses do digital marketing? According to one survey, the biggest reason is obvious: increase sales and revenue.

The Number: 31%. Thirty-one percent of small businesses said increasing sales/revenue was their goal for digital marketing.

The Quote: “Make them feel that you are talking to them personally, and you will improve brand loyalty.”

The What (and Why) of Paternity Leave

Paternity leave is a rising concern. It can be an effective means for retaining workers. Check out this in-depth piece on the what and why of paternity leave policy for small business.

About

Jesse Noyes is Head of Content for Zenefits. He started out as a business reporter before beginning a career in marketing. Jesse is naturally curious not only about the work people do, but why they do it. His first job was building freestanding stone walls in his home state of Maine.

Category: The Daily Rundown


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