The Daily Rundown: Ages 20 to 39

We look at strategies for managing millennials, the SBA’s efforts to court entrepreneurial military spouses and the difference between a seeing-eye dog and a therapy peacock.

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The Daily Rundown

Welcome to the Small Business Run Down. Each day, we bring you stories and trends that impact small business owners and their workforce.

Today we look at strategies for managing millennials, the SBA’s efforts to court entrepreneurial military spouses and the difference between a seeing-eye dog and a therapy peacock. Let’s get to it!

Managing millennials may be key to small biz success

Baby Boomers might have an edge when it comes to entrepreneurship, but the real winners are the managers who learn the importance of motivating millennials in the workplace. In order to capitalize on the talent of workers between the ages of 20 and 39, small business owners should cultivate communication and understanding between multiple generations. Millennials, in particular, thrive on feedback and having a clear path to promotion. 

The Number: 1980. The Millennial generation includes Americans born between 1980 and 2000. 

The Quote: “Millennials want to move up and they want to learn.”

SBA stepping up to support military spouses in business 

According to some data, military families report difficulty making ends meet at twice the rate of their civilian counterparts. Furthermore, frequent moves can make it difficult for military spouses to access meaningful work. The SBA believes that entrepreneurship is one important solution for supporting bringing military families and has compiled resources to help this population succeed in business. (Pssst….if you’re having trouble hiring during this labor shortage, it might be worth looking into hiring military spouses if you live near a base!)

The Number: 24%. While the national unemployment rate is under 4%, the unemployment rate for military spouses is almost 6 times that at 24%. 

The Quote:Entrepreneurship offers a more flexible and sustainable source of income for our nation’s more than one million military spouses.”

Service animals in the workplace gives new meaning to “work like a dog”

As comfort and therapy animals increase in popularity (and notoriety) small business owners must grapple with questions about which animals are allowed in the workplace and what their responsibility for accommodating them. It’s important to note that there’s a distinct difference between trained, working service animals, such a guide dog for a visually impaired person, and a therapy animal, like a rabbit (or a peacock) that’s used for emotional support. 

The Number: II & III. Under Titles II & III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, service animals are dogs specifically trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Comfort or therapy animals are not part of this designation. 

The Quote: Don’t assume they’re going to disrupt the workplace. Most animals can even go hours without needing to relieve themselves.”

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