Can we stop paying an employee once they’ve submit their letter of resignation even if the date of resignation is in the future?

You’re obligated to pay your employee for all of the work and / or time that they give you. After Receiving Notice If an employee has put in their two weeks’ notice, you’re still obligated to pay for any work that they perform. If your employee has ceased all performance of their job duties, then […]

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You’re obligated to pay your employee for all of the work and / or time that they give you.

After Receiving Notice

If an employee has put in their two weeks’ notice, you’re still obligated to pay for any work that they perform.

If your employee has ceased all performance of their job duties, then you’re likely justified in not paying for the remaining period of time. Similarly, if an employee has given notice, you could choose to have them stop working immediately. In this case, you’re only responsible for compensating for all of the work they did until that point.

Things to Consider

Giving future notice of resignation is a practice that you want to promote among your employees. If an employee gives two weeks notice, and then you do everything you can to avoid compensating them for their remaining time, other employees may be less prone to giving notice in the future. It’s usually best to pay employees properly for their time after giving notice to establish a good precedent of being fair to employees who are considerate enough to not leave you hanging unexpectedly.

Helpful Links:

Two week notice – PPSpublishers.com

Final Paycheck Info – zenefits.com

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