What are the best practices for recording a workplace injury, according to OSHA?

In accordance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s recordkeeping regulations, employers with more than 10 employees who aren’t classified as a partially exempt industry must prepare and maintain records of all serious workplace injuries and illnesses using the OSHA 300 log. What Counts OSHA defines work-related injuries, illnesses and fatalities as those in which […]

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In accordance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s recordkeeping regulations, employers with more than 10 employees who aren’t classified as a partially exempt industry must prepare and maintain records of all serious workplace injuries and illnesses using the OSHA 300 log.

What Counts

OSHA defines work-related injuries, illnesses and fatalities as those in which an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the condition. In addition, if an event or exposure in the work environment significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness this is also considered work-related.”

To Be Reported Directly to OSHA

All employers must report:

All work-related fatalities within 8 hours
All work-related in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, or losses of an eye within 24 hours

You may report via:

Phone using OSHA’s free and confidential number: 1-800-321-OSHA (6742)
Calling your closest area office during regular business hours
Online form available soon

For Other Injuries

Employers should use OSHA 300 log](https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/RKforms.html) to keep a record of all work-related injuries. More information on the specifics involved in proper recordkepping can be found on the [OSHA website.

Helpful Links:

Record Keeping – OSHA

Indiana Compliance – in.gov

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